Winter Riding

Winter Riding

Winter Riding in Windsor - Under the Ambassador Bridge

Winter Riding in Windsor - Under the Ambassador Bridge

I felt guilty because I really haven’t ridden for the last 6 weeks or so, and I saw quite a few cyclists out riding last week. I took a (very) short spin down to the bridge, and snapped a few photos while I was down there.

If you’re a Windsorite with the motivation to ride outside this winter, check out BikeSabbath’s Winter Ride Challenge Series (2-3 hour rides, Fridays nights and Sunday mornings, points based on attendance, and temperature, bonus points for single speed). If you’ve put the bike away for the winter, or are riding the trainer instead – you might want to check out Maple Leaf Cycling’s SWIFT (indoor) training.

Copenhagenize.com had an article about banning winter cycling in Thunder Bay. A cyclist was hospitalized there after a collision with a car, and comments on the Thunder Bay tbnewswatch article are calling for a ban on winter cycling. Interestingly, the City of Thunder Bay puts on “Safe Winter Cycling Workshops” in partnership with Lakehead University.

Meanwhile, the StarTribune had a great article about how Minneapolis (rated #1 American city for cycling) has more and more cyclists are taking up winter cycling. Bike Walk Twin Cities has found that 20% of cyclists will ride in even the worst conditions.

 

weBike
info@bikewindsoressex.com
6 Comments
  • Owen
    Posted at 14:37h, 23 January Reply

    I was out several days last week and one evening, Thursday. The snow was falling and if it’s ‘warm’ enough to snow that usually means there isn’t as much bitter in the Windsor air. That was the case. I showed up for a 7pm meeting only to find out I had the wrong week. No matter, it was a splendid ride and the drivers operating motorized vehicles where civil. I wanted to be out yesterday and I wish I was right now but I am deep in study mode, or rather I will be right after I click Post Comment.

    • Steve
      Posted at 14:43h, 23 January Reply

      My short ride was actually quite nice, but the snow in the face wasn’t. Needed to put the balaclava on. Maybe I will get adventurous over the next week or two and head back out again.

  • Rebecca
    Posted at 19:24h, 23 January Reply

    As Steve knows I ride everyday in the winter during my commute to work and back home again (25KM round trip). If you dress right, it really isn’t that bad. I learned last year to wear ski goggles and this year I got studded tires for my bike. I can ride easily through the ice and snow. I know that only a handful of people are riding as much as me during the winter, but I must say that it really isn’t too bad. Drivers seem more respectful in the winter then they do in the summer! Anyway…to those still riding – hats off (or rather on 🙂 to you! See you on the road!!

    • Owen
      Posted at 20:13h, 23 January Reply

      Studded tires are a must. Layers is the secret to warmth and being able to cool back down quick when inside. Goggles, being a glasses wearer I have never tried them. I find I’m good with my regular glasses & clip-on sunglasses. A hat with with built in ear covers over my balaclava works great for me. Last year I added lobster mitt type gloves by Louis Garneau which provide good grip but finger to finger warmth.

      I agree about drivers of motorized vehicles being generally more curious in winter – weird, maybe they fear us sliding under them and their getting the blame whereas in summer it seems to be sport to see how close they can crowd us. Maybe snow just generally mellows drivers out?

  • Andrew
    Posted at 23:45h, 23 January Reply

    I like your photos Steve.

    And I notice Owen’s comment about studded tires.
    I heard that in snow conditions a road bike is better,
    because skinny tires cut through the snow,
    whereas thicker tires cling to it.

    What do you think?
    This might be a good debate topic.

    • Owen
      Posted at 18:53h, 24 January Reply

      Andrew, I’m riding a touring bike which is a road bike (though not a racing road bike obviously) with 700C with a wider than typical road bike gage as is. In winter I go to a slightly wider tire with the studs. I cut through most everything. The thinner to tire the less stability. What you may, may, gain cutting through a clump of snow you’ll loose big time on ice or slick or slush, especially if you have little tread and no studs.

Post A Comment